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Lacan and Philosophy
Lacan and Philosophy: The New Generation
Lorenzo Chiesa

The articles collected in this volume, authored by some of the most renowned emerging authors working at the intersection between philosophy and psychoanalysis, rethink through Lacan, with as little jargon as possible, traditional concepts of Western thought such as realism, god, history, genesis and structure, writing, logic, freedom, the master and slave dialectic, the act, and the subject.





Recent Releases

Surber - What is Philosophy?

Jere O’Neill Surber

This work develops a new image of philosophy by mapping its field in terms of three conditions necessary for its actual existence: embodiment, signification, and ideality. This establishes an autonomous place for philosophy among religion, science, and art; moves beyond the impasses of postmodernisms; and provides a constructive basis for addressing new philosophical issues of the 21st century.


Indigenous Sovereignty and the Being of the Occupier: Manifesto for a White Australian Philosophy of Origins

Toula Nicolacopoulos and George Vassilacopoulos

Without exception, everyone is called upon today to construct his/her patriotic identity as a response to the supreme imperative of our shared whiteness: ‘act as if the land were initially without owners’. For white Australia, this imperative is more primordial than the usual formulation of the call to patriotism: ‘be prepared to sacrifice yourself for your country’, since patriotic sacrifice presupposes that one already has a country to which one is devoted. The imperative of whiteness touches the depth of our ontology since it is from this that the white collective springs as the creator of the white Australian nation-state. White Australians perpetually enter the world in so far as we faithfully obey the imperative to act as if the land were initially without owners and it is through this imperative that we cover over the question, ‘where do you come from?’, posed to us by the defiant resistance of Indigenous sovereign being. White Australia is therefore unavoidably implicated in the perpetuation of the nation that must act ‘as if …’ or what we call the ‘hypothetical nation.


The Disjunctive Logic of the World: Thinking Global Civil Society with Hegel

Toula Nicolacopoulos and George Vassilacopoulos

There is today a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural recognition of the need to reconceptualize the complexities of the global reality. In this study the authors present the view that a rethinking of Hegel’s concept of Civil Society has the potential to meet this need.


blackcover Monumental Fragments: Places of Philosophy in the Age of Dispersion George Vassilacopoulos

George Vassilacopoulos

At one and the same time the poet in me sinks and the rebel in me flies. The rebel encounters himself in the poet in whom the vision is drowned. The poet encounters himself in the rebel and becomes philosopher, the bearer of the vision of vision. Being this tension the ego falls in love with both. Fragments are the forgotten whispers of such falling.


Penumbra

Sigi Jöttkandt and Joan Copjec (eds.)

Umbr(a) was one of the most important US theory journals of the 1990s and early 2000s, publishing work by some of the greatest philosophers, psychoanalysts and theorists of our era. In every regard, it was ahead of the curve – in content, design, and style – often introducing thinkers who have subsequently become globally influential. This anthology presents a selection of the very best of Umbr(a), including contributions from Joan Copjec, Sam Gillespie, Juliet Flower MacCannell, Charles Shepherdson, Russell Grigg, Alenka Zupancic, Slavoj Žižek,Mladen Dolar, Catherine Malabou, Tim Dean, Steven Miller, Dominiek Hoens, Petar Ramadanovic, Sigi Jöttkandt, Colette Soler, Jelica Sumic and A. Kiarina Kordela.


Badiou in Jamaica

Colin Wright

This book foregrounds the centrality of political conflicts in the radical philosophy of Alain Badiou. It is divided into two halves. The first undertakes a reading of Badiou’s wider oeuvre (beyond Being and Event) and demonstrates that his political theory derives from analyses of key revolutionary sequences such as the Paris Commune, October ‘17, May ‘68 and the Chinese Cultural Revolution. In the second half, the book applies this schema to a concrete ‘situation’: colonial and post-colonial Jamaica.