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Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials

Reza Negarestani

Cyclonopedia is theoretical-fiction novel by Iranian philosopher and writer Reza Negarestani. Hailed by novelists, philosophers and cinematographers, Negarestani’s work is the first horror and science fiction book coming from and written on the Middle East.


The Radical Critique of Liberalism: In Memory of a Vision

Toula Nicolacopoulos

Despite political theorists’ repeated attempts to demonstrate their incoherence liberal values appear to have withstood the test of time. Indeed, engagement with them has become the meeting point of the different political philosophical traditions. But should radical critique justifiably become a thing of the past? Should political philosophy now be conducted in the light of the triumph of liberalism? These are the wider questions that the book takes up in an attempt to demonstrate the intellectual power of systemic critique in the tradition of Hegel. The author argues that the most ambitious of the communitarian critiques of liberal thought failed due to a fundamental weakness of their philosophical methodology. Moreover, the re-workings of these critiques by feminists, discourse ethicists, postmodern and postcolonial theorists have been equally unsuccessful because they have not traced the individualist commitment of liberal theory back to its source in liberal inquiring practices. Working through the theories of prominent liberal theorists, including John Rawls, Jeremy Waldron, Charles Larmore and Will Kymlicka, the book demonstrates that an adequate appreciation of the deep structural flaws of liberal theory presupposes the application of a critical philosophical methodology that has the power to reveal the systemic interconnections within and between the varieties of liberal inquiring practices.


The Mathematics of Novelty: Badiou’s Minimalist Metaphysics

Sam Gillespie

In this characteristically incisive analysis, Sam Gillespie maintains that, whereas novelty in Deleuze is ultimately located in a Leibnizian affirmation of the world, for Badiou, the new, which is the coming-to-be of a truth, must be located at the ‘void’ of any situation. Following a lucid presentation of the central concepts of Badiou’s philosophy as they relate to the problem of novelty (mathematics as ontology, truth, the subject and the event), Gillespie identifies a significant problem in Badiou’s conception of the subject which he suggests can be answered by way of a supplementary framework derived from Lacan’s concept of anxiety.


The Trip

George Papaellinas

The Trip is the story of Odysseus or Oddy who claims he’s as old as Arfstraya itself. He’s brain-damaged, demented, deluded or just senile. He is an old beer-drinker who has drunk too much grog in his time; he is perpetually down the local pub; indeed, he just about lives there… Or he’s been embittered by all the indignities he’s suffered as a Greek migrant to Arfstraya or he’s telling the truth and he really is one of the Olympian gods, an immortal, a minor deity, a demi- or semi-god who can even remember the dinosaurs… The Trip traverses Australian history, and features some prominent Australian historical personalities on the way.


The Spirit of the Age: Hegel and teh Fate of Thinking

Toula Nicolacopoulos, George Vassilacopoulos and Paul Ashton (eds)

Is it becoming more obvious today that the thinkers of the post-Hegelian era were/are not “able to bear the greatness, the immensity of the claims made by the human spirit”? Is our era the era of the “faint-hearted” philosophy? Celebrating 200 years since the publication of The Phenomenology of Spirit this volume addresses these questions through a renewed encounter with Hegel’s thought.



Alain Badiou
(edited and translated by Zachary Fraser and Tzuchien Tho)

The Concept of Model is the first of Alain Badiou’s early books to be translated fully into English. With this publication English readers finally have access to a crucial work by one of the world’s greatest living philosophers. Written on the eve of the events of May 1968, The Concept of Model provides a solid mathematical basis for a rationalist materialism. Badiou’s concept of model distinguishes itself from both logical positivism and empiricism by introducing a new form of break into the hitherto implicated realms of science and ideology, and establishing a new way to understand their disjunctive relation. Readers coming to Badiou for the first time will be struck by the clarity and force of his presentation, and the key place that The Concept of Model enjoys in the overall development of Badiou’s thought will enable readers already familiar with his work to discern the lineaments of his later radical developments. This translation is accompanied by a stunning new interview with Badiou in which he elaborates on the connections between his early and most recent thought.


Black River

Justin Clemens and Helen Johnson

Black River is the autobiography of a nonexistent personage. Drawing on literary techniques developed by Beckett, Burroughs and Borges, Black River plunges into a violent and surreal world from which the last traces of the gods have vanished. The reader will encounter such creatures as mouthers, pokers, the sucking lady, white curls, the loved one, the magistrate, and the ambassador, presented in spare, relentless prose. The text by Justin Clemens is supplemented with Helen Johnson’s extraordinary collages. Black River is a work of hallucinatory materialism.


Fifty Poems of Attar

Farid al-Din Attar
(Kenneth Avery & Ali Alizadeh - text, trans & analysis)

The great 13th century Sufi poet Farid al-Din Attar is renowned as an author of superb short lyrics written in the Persian language. Dealing with themes of love, passion and mysticism, the versions presented in this book are the first sustained offerings of Attar’s lyric poetry in English. Award-winning Iranian-born poet, Ali Alizadeh, and Persian specialist, Kenneth Avery, have collaborated on this project which aims to bring this remarkably vigorous yet subtle poetry to an English reading audience. The translations are accompanied by the Persian texts themselves, and explanatory notes, and are set in the context of his life and times by an illuminating introductory chapter. An original analysis of Attar’s poetic language and thought is also offered.


Praxis of Alain Badiou

Paul Ashton A. J. Bartlett, Justin Clemens (eds.)

The Praxis of Alain Badiou takes up the challenge of explicating, extending and, in many places, criticising Badiou’s stunningly original theses. Above all, the essays collected here put Badiou’s concepts to the test in a confrontation with the four great headings that he himself has identified as essential to our humanity: science, love, art and politics. Many of the contributors have already been recognised as outstanding translators of and commentators on Badiou’s work; they appear here with fresh voices also destined to make a mark.