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the works of gilles deleuze

Jon Roffe

The first of two volumes, The Works of Gilles Deleuze I: 1953-1969 introduces, book by book, the philosopher’s daunting corpus, from his early monographs on Hume, Nietzsche, Kant, and Bergson; to the “literary clinic” he creates in relation to Proust and Masoch; and, finally, to the landmark publication of Difference and Repetition (1968) and Logic of Sense (1969).


(Un)Willing Collectives: On Castoriadis, Philosophy and Politics

Toula Nicolacopoulos and George Vassilacopoulos

In advancing the political project of autonomy, Castoriadis raises the fundamental question: what ought we to think? Following an interpretation of his elucidation of the connections between time, history, and the groundlessness of the world and society, this study argues for a broadening of Castoriadis’s question, something which enables attention, not just to the subject matter of thinking, but also its form and the thinker’s situatedness. While Castoriadis’s insights may be usefully deployed both to expose the limits of inherited thought, which privileges the power of receiving meaning and value over creation and creativity, and to explore the interaction between politics and philosophy, his own approach may well represent the other equally problematic side of the Platonic tradition he criticizes. Consequently, Castoriadis’s notions of radical democratic subjectivity and autonomous thinking, both of which respond to the ‘ought’ question, may inadvertently conform to a mode of being that can do no more than protest the dominant formalism characterising the modern Western world. At the core of this limitation lies a decisive issue for philosophy: whether the enactment of thinking is informed by the historical irruption and retreat of the visionary collective.


Fogarty

Lionel Fogarty
Philip Morrissey and Tyne Daile Sumner, eds

This is the first selected edition of Lionel Fogarty’s poetry covering nearly forty years of his writing; it contains 174 poems from each of his eleven published collections, along with a range of unpublished poems up till the present. The volume features an introduction, biography, notes and glossary and has been put together with the full cooperation of the poet.


Stock - These Wonderful Spring Days

Jeremy Stock

These Wonderful Spring Days is a collection of work arranged in the order it was written, allowing for the idea of progress. It allows for the idea of progress in the sense that, even if there is to be none, it is nevertheless allowed for. Space is made for it, time is allocated to it.There is no visionary experience, for anyone, of anyone, in this work, it is all strictly material–material in the sense that it is a temporary and transient arrangement.


Aesthetics After Finitude

Baylee Brits, Prudence Gibson and Amy Ireland

Traditionally aesthetics has been associated with phenomenal experience, human apprehension and an appreciation of beauty—the domains in which human cognition is rendered finite. What is an aesthetics that might occur ‘after finitude’?


Politics, Ethics and Performance

Hélène Cixous
(edited by Lara Stevens)

Politics, Ethics and Performance: Hélène Cixous and the Théâtre du Soleil is a collection of essays by French feminist poet, playwright and philosopher Hélène Cixous. Cixous’ performative and poetic mode of writing explores the relationship between theatrical performance and contemporary politics.



Vrasidas Karalis

Reflections on Presence are philosophical aphorisms that investigate the interconnected nature of the material and the mental worlds. They addresses concerns of contemporary thinking, like language, ethics, faith and individuality and construct a program for the re-invention of the dominant contemporary philosophical paradigm which is reluctant to articulate positive statements bout reality. From the perspective of Marcus Aurelius, Ignatius Loyola and Nikos Kazantzakis they address the concerns raised by Blaise Pascal, Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Heidegger.



Dessislav Valkanov

Knowledge and Freedom is a collection of essays on the philosophy of German idealism. The central issue is the real status of human knowledge, or put in Kantian terms, the limits of human cognition and their implications for our understanding and practice of freedom (theoretical, moral, and political). The connection between knowledge and freedom is then investigated in the post-Kantian philosophy of Fichte, Schelling and Hegel.


Stretchmarks of Sun

Dominique Hecq

Stretchmarks of Sun is informed by the crossing of borders—geographical, historical, formal and subjective. It explores autobiographical fragments drawing on the protagonist’s experience of dislocation and reconnection. It is poetry that draws together strands plucked from different disciplines, ways of knowing and art forms to reveal how home is made out of love and language.


Reading the Country

Krim Benterrak, Stephen Muecke and Paddy Roe

Reading the Country explores the meaning and politics of place (Roebuck Plains) through Aboriginal narratives, songs, conversations, photographs and paintings, together with European historical, geographic and geological knowledge; linked by a series of explanatory, exploratory and analytical essays on history, anthropology, critical theory and painting; interview with Peter Yu, NAC representative.



Lorenzo Chiesa

The articles collected in this volume, authored by some of the most renowned emerging authors working at the intersection between philosophy and psychoanalysis, rethink through Lacan, with as little jargon as possible, traditional concepts of Western thought such as realism, god, history, genesis and structure, writing, logic, freedom, the master and slave dialectic, the act, and the subject.


Surber - What is Philosophy?

Jere O’Neill Surber

This work develops a new image of philosophy by mapping its field in terms of three conditions necessary for its actual existence: embodiment, signification, and ideality. This establishes an autonomous place for philosophy among religion, science, and art; moves beyond the impasses of postmodernisms; and provides a constructive basis for addressing new philosophical issues of the 21st century.


Indigenous Sovereignty and the Being of the Occupier: Manifesto for a White Australian Philosophy of Origins

Toula Nicolacopoulos and George Vassilacopoulos

Without exception, everyone is called upon today to construct his/her patriotic identity as a response to the supreme imperative of our shared whiteness: ‘act as if the land were initially without owners’. For white Australia, this imperative is more primordial than the usual formulation of the call to patriotism: ‘be prepared to sacrifice yourself for your country’, since patriotic sacrifice presupposes that one already has a country to which one is devoted. The imperative of whiteness touches the depth of our ontology since it is from this that the white collective springs as the creator of the white Australian nation-state. White Australians perpetually enter the world in so far as we faithfully obey the imperative to act as if the land were initially without owners and it is through this imperative that we cover over the question, ‘where do you come from?’, posed to us by the defiant resistance of Indigenous sovereign being. White Australia is therefore unavoidably implicated in the perpetuation of the nation that must act ‘as if …’ or what we call the ‘hypothetical nation.


The Disjunctive Logic of the World: Thinking Global Civil Society with Hegel

Toula Nicolacopoulos and George Vassilacopoulos

There is today a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural recognition of the need to reconceptualize the complexities of the global reality. In this study the authors present the view that a rethinking of Hegel’s concept of Civil Society has the potential to meet this need.


blackcover Monumental Fragments: Places of Philosophy in the Age of Dispersion George Vassilacopoulos

George Vassilacopoulos

At one and the same time the poet in me sinks and the rebel in me flies. The rebel encounters himself in the poet in whom the vision is drowned. The poet encounters himself in the rebel and becomes philosopher, the bearer of the vision of vision. Being this tension the ego falls in love with both. Fragments are the forgotten whispers of such falling.